While Some Cruise Lines Delay Start Dates, Others Bump Them Up

Posted on Wednesday, October 14th, 2020 at 5:58 pm    

In recent months around the world, cruise lines have had to adjust to the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic. In some cases, this has meant halting operations entirely. For instance, in the United States, a No Sail Order has banned cruise ships from U.S. ports until November 1. Even before the CDC announced this particular date, the cruise industry had initiated its own ban on U.S. activity until November.

However, some cruise lines around the world have been eager to welcome guests back onto their ships. On August 16, the MSC Grandiosa left the port of Genoa, Italy, and became the first ship to set sail in months. Since then, other ships have followed in its footsteps.

As more and more cruise ships take to the water, many cruise-goers will wonder: which cruises are – and are not – in operation, and why? And how are cruise lines keeping their guests safe?

Which Cruise Lines Are Delaying Start Dates?

Recently, Carnival Cruise Line has announced new trip cancellations that will extend into the spring of 2021. The canceled trips include all cruises leaving from Miami aboard the Carnival Magic until March 13; all cruises from Tampa aboard the Carnival Paradise until March 19; and all cruises from New Orleans aboard the Carnival Valor until April 29.

Carnival’s recent cancellations appear to be a COVID safety measure. Christina Duffy, the president of Carnival Cruise Line, stated in a press release: “We are committed to providing our guests and travel agent partners with certainty where we can, although we regret disappointing our guests.”

Which Cruise Lines Are In (or Soon To Be In) Operation?

Unlike Carnival’s U.S.-based cruises, other ships have restarted operations this fall or announced plans to do so soon. Since the MSC Grandiosa set sail in August, multiple cruise lines have resumed trips departing from Europe.

In mid-September, AIDA Cruises announced that it would bump up its restart date for Mediterranean cruises to October 17. AIDA, which is a German subsidiary of Carnival Corporation, had previously announced that it would delay trips until November 1.

AIDA’s announcement follows a similar decision from another Carnival Corp. cruise line in Europe. Costa Cruises, an Italian Carnival line, officially resumed operations when two of its ships set sail on September 6.

How Are Cruise Lines Keeping Passengers Safe?

Cruise ships have responded to the pandemic by implementing new safety measures for guests and crew. For example, AIDA has developed a “health and safety” program for all vessels, which includes:

  • A mask requirement in indoor common spaces
  • Social distancing requirements
  • Continuous cleaning and disinfection measures
  • Hand sanitizer stations

Unfortunately, safety measures such as these cannot fully eliminate the risk of COVID spread. As the CDC has recently noted, foreign cruise lines have continued to see COVID outbreaks aboard their ships this summer and fall.

Contact Louis A. Vucci P.A.

If you or your loved one has fallen ill during or since a cruise, get in touch with Louis A. Vucci P.A. today. We know that cruise lines have a responsibility to keep their guests safe – and if your illness is a result of cruise ship negligence, one of our skilled attorneys will fight to win the compensation you deserve. Call (786) 375-0344 to schedule your free, confidential consultation now.


Cruise Ships Barred from U.S. Ports Until November

Posted on Wednesday, October 14th, 2020 at 5:39 pm    

On September 30, the CDC announced that it would extend the No Sail Order for cruise ships through the end of October. In other words, cruise ships will not be allowed to operate in U.S. waters or dock in U.S. ports through at least October 31. This move is intended to minimize the risk of COVID-19 outbreaks among would-be cruise guests.

In of itself, the No Sail Order is old news – it has been in place since mid-March of this year. However, if the order actually expires at the end of this month, there may be serious implications for U.S. cruise-goers. So, what is the reasoning behind the No Sail Order, and how long will it last?

The Reasoning Behind the No Sail Order

When the No Sail Order first took effect in March, cruise ships had been making national headlines for having rampant COVID-19 outbreaks. The Princess Diamond was one of the most infamous examples of this phenomenon. By the end of that voyage, more than 700 of the ship’s 3,711 passengers and crew members tested positive for coronavirus.

The No Sail Order is a response to the risk of high infection rates and possible deaths on cruise ships. As the CDC noted in its recent announcement, at least 41 deaths have resulted from cruise-related COVID-19 cases in U.S. waters since March 1. Since the pandemic continues to affect U.S. communities, the order has been extended multiple times to reflect the ongoing danger.

Furthermore, as the CDC points out, cruise ships operating in other parts of the world have not proven that they can successfully mitigate COVID-19 risk. Some of these ships have experienced outbreaks in recent months, despite operating at lower-than-usual capacity. As the announcement states:

“Recent outbreaks on cruise ships overseas provide current evidence that cruise ship travel continues to transmit and amplify the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 – even when ships sail at reduced passenger capacities – and would likely spread the infection into U.S. communities if passenger operations were to resume prematurely in the United States.”

How Long Will the No Sail Order Last?

For the moment, the No Sail Order is set to last until November 1. Of course, the order has been extended multiple times in past months, and it could be extended at the last minute again. (The most recent extension was made official just two hours before the order was due to expire at the end of September.)

However, there is reason to anticipate that the order will actually expire at the end of October. According to reporting from Axios, CDC Director Robert Redfield pushed to extend the No Sail Order until February 15, but was overruled by the current administration. The October 31 date is the result of the administration’s decision, and also matches up with the cruise industry’s own ban on U.S. activity until November.

Contact Louis A. Vucci P.A.

If you have suffered harm related to COVID-19 exposure on a cruise ship, do not delay in contacting a lawyer at Louis A. Vucci P.A.. The experienced cruise ship negligence lawyers at Louis A. Vucci P.A. can help you understand the paths you may be able to take to recovery. To schedule a free consultation, call (786) 375-0344 or fill out our contact form now.


Clemson student climbs Carnival Ecstasy’s mast and falls to his demise

Posted on Wednesday, October 1st, 2014 at 5:32 pm    

SEPTEMBER 29– A 20-year-old man has died after falling from the forward mast of a cruise ship as it was on its way back to the port of Miami.

Miami-Dade police has identified the victim as 20-year-old North Carolina native and Clemson University student, Kendall Wernet. According to investigations, Wernet along with five or six others climbed the ship’s mast to catch the sunrise, dodging several clear warning signs on their way up. As they were gathered on the Carnival Ecstasy’s mast, the radar system was turned on and apparently caught Wernet, causing him to fall 20-feet onto the deck below.

Evidence points to this unfortunate incident as an accident, with no proof that there was alcohol or foul play involved.

Our entire Miami based legal team at The Vucci Law Group, P.A. sends our condolences to Kendall’s friends and family in this unfortunate time.


Royal Caribbean to stop cruise trips to Port of New Orleans

Posted on Thursday, June 19th, 2014 at 5:24 pm    

Miami-based Royal Caribbean International announced it will conclude its cruise ship service next year from the Port of New Orleans, The Times-Picayune reported on June 10.

Royal Caribbean spokeswoman Janet Diaz said there are no New Orleans ships planned for the winter of 2015-2016. The 2,360-passenger Serenade of the Seas ship replaced the larger Navigator of the Seas at the port in December 2013. Serenade underwent a major $29 million renovation. Three restaurants and an outdoor café were added, plus a wireless internet connection was installed throughout.

Port of New Orleans president and CEO Gary LaGrange said that upon conferring with Royal Caribbean CEO Adam Goldstein, he gathered that there is a possibility that Hong Kong will replace New Orleans as a port destination due to an increasing demand for cruise ships in Asia. The cruise line has not yet said whether it will return to port at New Orleans in 2016.

Cruises are a beloved vacation for many American families. However, dangers are still prevalent on cruise ships. If you have been injured aboard a cruise ship, contact a member of our legal team at the Louis A. Vucci P.A. today by dialing (786) 375-0344 to discuss your situation.


Cruise Ships gather oceanic and atmospheric data

Posted on Tuesday, May 27th, 2014 at 5:40 pm    

Celebrity Cruises’ Celebrity Equinox has partnered with Royal Caribbean International’s Allure of the Seas and Explorer of the Seas in an initiative to monitor ocean circulation dynamics and assess oceanic and atmospheric conditions, the Royal Caribbean blog reported on May 13.

The data gathered by both cruise lines is turned over to the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science for analysis. Included in the list of things that the scientists record are ocean temperature, ocean surface properties, salinity, and chlorophyll concentration. They also monitor meteorological data. Understanding and comparing this data will make it easier for scientists to forecast climate change effects on marine life and habitats like coral reefs.

Cruises are popular with families in the United States as a convenient way to experience fun and travel on a vacation. However, cruises also expose passengers to injuries they may not be able to treat as well on site. If this happens to you on a cruise, call our attorneys at The Vucci Law Group, P.A. by dialing (786) 375-0344.


Carnival to start sailing from Galveston

Posted on Wednesday, April 9th, 2014 at 5:33 pm    

Starting October 2015, Doral in Miami, Florida-based and British-American owned Carnival Cruise Lines will be offering 10- and 11-night cruise trips aboard its 2,754-passenger Carnival Triumph from areas between Galveston, Texas and San Juan, and Puerto Rico.

Cruise stops will include detours at lesser-known Caribbean ports, such as those in Bonaire, Grenada, Martinique, and Antigua.

According to Carnival, the new schedule will include 11-night sailings from Galveston to San Juan that will start on Oct. 24, 2015, and resume on Jan. 16, 2016. Two 10-night voyages from San Juan to Galveston will take place on Nov. 4, 2015 and Jan. 27, 2016.

The two schedules were planned with no repeating ports in mind so they can be part of a 21-night sailing trip that spans a few dozen Caribbean destinations starting from Galveston.

Unfortunately, far too many people suffer serious harm on their cruises due to the negligence of cruise staff and other parties. If this has happened to you, our lawyers at Louis A. Vucci P.A., can possibly help you pursue compensation. Call us at (786) 375-0344 to discuss your situation and potential legal options.